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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)
. one country right and the heart of europe appears to be a new to the currency crisis. switzerland's fanc is riding high and has become a safe haven for investors. >> this is a landscape that has attracted tourists for over a century. this year, visitors are staying on the ground. those that are here are counting their pennies. as the euro slides, the swiss franc rises and rises. foreign tourists find switzerland too expensive. meanwhile, the swiss are neglecting their on resorts in favor of a cheap holiday abroad. >> i am watching the situation with enormous concern. things have gotten worse. jobs and businesses are really in danger now and that is bad for our economy. >> the swiss franc is at an all- time high against the euro. a new study shows that a thousand hotels across the alps are threatened with closure. >> there will be job cuts. there has already been. each of the hotels have had to cut back from jobs. >> swiss hotel owners are looking anxiously to the government for solutions but so far in vain. an attempt by the swiss national bank to slow down the rise of the franc s
to the currency crisis. switzerland's frank is rising high and it has become a haven for investors. how helpful is that in this economy? >> the landscape has attracted tourists for over a century. this year, visitors are counting their pennies. euro slides and the swiss franc rises. foreign tourists find switzerland too expensive. >> [speaking foreign language] >> i am watching the situation with enormous concern. things have gotten or sign the last few months. jobs and businesses are really in danger now and that's really bad for our local economy. >> the swiss franc is at an all- time high against the euro. a new study shows that 1000 hotels across the swiss south are threatened with closure. >> there have been job cuts. each of the hotels have already had to cut back on jobs. we have cut two positions. >> hotel owners are looking anxiously to the government for solutions. so far, in vain. an attempt by the swiss national bank to buy out euros and slow down the rise of the swiss franc quickly resulted in the swiss bank losing over $20 billion. while the crisis in the eurozone continues, the s
changed. as your zone countries ponder what to do about greece and other states, switzerland's franc is riding high and has become a safe haven for investors. >> it is a landscape that attracted tourists for over a century. this year visitors to switterland are on the ground and those that are here are counting their pennies. the your -- the euro slide and the swiss franc rises and rises. foreign tourists find switzerland too expensive, the swiss are favoring their own resorts in favor of a cheap holiday abroad. >> i'm watching this situation with enormous concern. things have gotten worse in the last few months. jobs and businesses are in danger now and that is very bad for our local economy. >> the swiss franc is at an all-time high against the euro and a new study shows a thousand hotels across the swiss alps are threatened with closure. >> there will be drop cuts. each hotel has had to cut back on jobs. we have cut two positions. >> swiss hotel owners are looking anxiously to the government for solutions. so far in vain. an attempt by the swiss national bank to buy up euros and s
government plans to raise the ratio of renewable energy from the current 17% to 80% by 2050. switzerland and italy have also decided to phase out nuclear power generation. >>> south korea is demonstrating the power of its nuclear power technology outside of its capital, seoul. some 60 firms and institutions involved in construction, research and development of nuclear reactors are taking part in the three-day event. the south korean government is sponsoring the exhibition to help domestic nuclear businesses sell their technologies to other countries. the vice-minister of the knowledge economy ministry made a speech at the opening ceremony. >> translator: after fukushima accident, we checked nuclear plants. we have about 50 improvement plans and are getting ready for further inspections. >> he added that nuclear power generation stands a the at crossroads but the industry is making every effort to achieve complete safety. the displace include models and papals showing a nuclear reactor in the united arab emirates that you south korea exported in 2009. the government had earlier announced
the foreign authorities in germany or switzerland contact us. then we take them back to hungary and put them in prison. >> the only person actively trying to help the women on the street is the head of the hon gary and prostitute interest protection association. she makes it possible for girls to leave the profession -- leave the profession and trained for other jobs. the country's right-wing government has cut all of their funding for the organization. >> i do not really want to comment, but we do not think that this government's philosophy, no one supports us anymore. >> a founding member of the helsinki commission for human rights says that the prostitutes and victims of prostitutes were robbed of all of their rights. >> this behavior toward prostitutes is a part of the hypocrisy that dominates everywhere. >> she is now collecting the names of politicians who have publicly opposed red light districts. she says she does not want to blackmail anyone, but hopes they will come around to her way of thinking. they will still be available for evening events, but in future dancing in scanty cloth
. experts at the university in switzerland to say it may not be justified. they argue that factors such as debt level don't justify a negative rating in themselves. they can quickly turn into a self-fulfilling prophecies. the low ratings make lenders demand higher rates making it harder for governments to raise capital. even when the agency's hong give positive ratings, they can still get it wrong. take the u.s., for example. the agencies give a positive assessment of complex packages of property loans that turned into a toxic assets. a huge market collapsed ushering in the global financial crisis. the agencies came under fire for failing to see the storm. since then, they have been more cautious and more negative to the detriment of certain european states. >> thank you for joining us. stay with us if you can.
, switzerland, thanks to james joyce. my dancing there became walking through the silence of the city. instead of people looking at me like my family did when i was a child, people began to ask me, where are you from? i felt disoriented, exiled. the changing perception of nature, religious views, philosophical and political opinions, botanical knowledge and idiomatic sounds, everything new. i asked myself many times for a specific reason why my irish family went to cuba and began searching for missing pieces of my irish history in irish, cuban, and catalan archives to discover before me that i had a fascinating history of displacement and transformations in various geographic setings. my book, ticket it ride, is a personal journey towards the past and the present. there is no one but many places i belong to: havana, dublin, mahon, barcelona, and since the lay 80's, the bay area. so thank you very much. . >> i'm going to do this in about 5 parts. i hope you will bear with me. first of all, i want to thank cross roads for inviting me. it's a great pleasure for me to be here and i want to thank,
by malnutrition and dehydration. this nurse from switzerland, every day she saves lives here, but sometimes her patients die and she grieves for them. >> i saw a crowded area. i went there, and the baby was changed. i took, it i tried to do something, but outside, you cannot do anything, so it just died in my arms, and it's really hard. >> so many people are flooding in here. there's not enough food, water, or shelter for them all. relief workers are struggling to cope. >> this camp is growing all the time, becoming increasingly overcrowded and unsanitary as well. aid agencies are stretched to the very limits, and more people are arriving with every day that passes, well over 1,000 of them fleeing from civil war and now from drought as well in their native somalia. no one here has any intention of going home any time soon. ben brown, bbc news at a refugee camp. >> you're watching "bbc world news." still to come -- syria accuses the united states of involvement in the anti-government protests that began four months ago. we'll be live in damascus. >> it's the highest lottery prize ever offered in
, switzerland, as well as parts of germany as well. looking quite calm for parts of the british isles but lots of rain bands ushering in. temperatures will be dropping significantly. 18 degrees in london. and 19 in paris. rather chilly here. ahead of it, lots of hot air coming in from the mediterranean. that's going to be boosting temperatures. 34 degrees in vienna. 31, stays hot in the balkans as well. 35 degrees in belgrade. all right. i shall leave you with your city-by-city forecast. >>> on the new york foreign exchange the dollar briefly fell to the mid 70 yen range on tuesday on fears that the greek debt crisis may spread to other countries such as italy and spain. moves to sell the euro and buy the yen helped to push the dollar down to a level last seen after the march 11 disaster in eastern japan. the greenback was being traded at 78.49 yen at one time. earlier in london the dollar dipped below the 80 yen level. the dollar is currently being traded at, we'll see those figures in a moment, here we are, 79.39-41, and the euro is currently at 111.28-3 >>> and that wraps up this edition of
and he had a history of skitsofrania. her sister was committed in switzerland and it is conceivable that the mother also had it. >> disabilities on his side? >> not that we know of. certainly he blamed her. >> well when he died, his brain was extracted and his eyes were extracted. and the rest was cremated. correct? >> yes. >> the brain was then divided into parts, was it not? >> yes. >> many parts. like over 200? >> yes, i think it was 400. >> was it reas assembled? >> i don't think so. >> they have reconstructed it on the base of the photographs. i saw that on a television program. >> how good is that? >> how idiotic if you want to somehow see the whole brain, you are going to be able to find the source of his genius. >> did he have an affair with his best friend's niece? >> his best friend's niece, yes. he also had an affair with his future wife's daughter, or tried to. he tried to marry the daughter of elsa. >> he proposed to her? >> we only know that indirectly, again. she wrote to a letter that einstein was putting the make on her and she wasn't really that i
cancer in children and teens. researchers in switzerland looks at hundreds of brain cancer patients and found they were not more likely to have been regular cell phone users but experts say the study only looks at childhood brain tumors and doesn't address the long-term impact of cell phone use. >> the question is, the child that begins using the cell phone at 7 or age 12, when they're 47, after four decades of using the cell phone, is there risk of developing brain cancer higher? >> reporter: there's speculation children may be more susceptible because their skulls are thinner and more radiation could penetrate the brain tissue. experts say if you're concerned use an earpiece. michelle greenwald isn't concerned because her daughter mostly text and only talks when necessary. >> when she calls me, i know she's okay. >> reporter: rebecca likes her independence and likes knowing help is a phone call away. joel brown, cbs news, los angeles. >>> just ahead on the "morning news" the opposite of urban flight, why people are heading back to the city. >>> and one of the longest manhunts for
that the goddess of the beast first appeared in a white cow. >>> for one group of students in switzerland school isn't out for summer. one charm school is in full swing teaching etiquette classes to young professional women. students from around the world attend sessions on how to eat food without ever using one's hands. even a tricky apple or orange should be peeled or cut only by using a fork and a knife. >>> if you look carefully, aliens seem to have taken over paris. a french artist known only as invader has installed whacky mosaics of alien faces scattered throughout the city. it's his way of getting the pieces out of the gallery and on to the streets for everyone to enjoy. in total about a thousand faces have popped up so far. >>> runners opt for sneakers, but that's not nearly as interesting as what runners wear for one race in spain. high heels hit madrid's cobble streets in what has become an annual tradition during a week-long gay pride festival. about ten competitors took part. no word on whether any high priced designer pairs were harmed during the race. here's to hoping, right? >> i
in parts of france, spain, and switzerland, as well as germany. now the system will make its way in a northeasterly direction before moving into sweden on your thursday, bringing the heaviest rain and strong thunderstorms to this part. and then a long a frontal line we will see scattered showers, but nothing as severe as what we were looking at yesterday. out towards the west, it's sunny in spain and portugal. it will be sunny for you, and 22 in london and 21 in paris, and looking cooler in vienna. all right. here is your extended forecast now. >>> japan has advanced to the first ever final in fefa world cup in germany after a win on wednesday. the united states won the other semifinal against france, 3-1. japan scored in the first half of the semifinal, nine minutes after the team allowed sweden a goal. 15 minutes into the second half, japan's captain netted a goal, putting the team in the lead. and they clinched the scoring again four minutes later. that put the national team into the final securing a first medal for the country. japan will have to beat the united states on sun
phone. now researchers in switzerland found children who used them on a regular basis are not more susceptible to brain cancer. they looked at hundreds of brain cancer patients and found those people were not more likely to have been regular cell phone users. however the study only looked at childhood brain tumors and not the long term risk. >> the question is the child begins using a cell phone at 7 or age 12. when they're 47 after four decades of using the cell phone is there a risk of developing -- development brain cancer higher. >> experts say if you're concerned about the risk of cancer, text instead of making calls. >>> another monster night, we have a no hitter in baseball. the giants making major trades. next. turn left. you have arrived. sweet belt. e-reader for textbooks. gps. hd video cam for lectures. game pad. have you ever considered this ? it's got all that and more than 200,000 apps. technology to learn and play on-the-go. only at verizon. buy one droid 3 by motorola, the thinnest full qwerty smartphone ever for $199.99, and get another one free. >>> the giants hav
to switzerland have become more expensive. many tourists are now opting for other destinations. >> in the winter, 5% fewer tourists from europe came here. we expect 5% fewer european customers this summer, as well. >> the tourists that do come are cutting back. they're eating at less expensive restaurants and staying for fewer days, and some are laying off staff. >> to monday's market action, european shares dipped to fresh seven-month lows after results from banks stress tests lead to a sell-off, even among those perceived to be healthy. our correspondent sent us this summary of the sessions in frankfurt. >> there was tension here on the floor of the frankfurt exchange. you could see it. people were uncertain about how the next few days would develop in the greek sovereign debt crisis. will the eu summit bring a clear answer on which way the direction is going to go? what is quite expected of investors, banks, private investors in solving this crisis? shares taking a real hit. the dax was down by over 4%, and in the euro stoxx, banks downed by a whopping 7%. the stress tests not really getting
to country. embryo screening is banned in italy, austria, and switzerland. ireland and finland have yet to legislate. 11 european countries, now including germany, place some restrictions on the testing, while belgium has predictably liberal laws governing the issue. at the center for reproductive genetics in brussels, the professor is one of the leading screening experts. about 100 german couples visit him every year. they'll suffer from a genetic defect and their children might be severely disabled at birth. >> it is most of the time on the genetic diseases one gene. people don't think that you have all these different issues, blue eyes, this is imagination, not reality. we're talking about severely sick children. >> but critics worry about how things may develop in the future. will couples want to select embryos with desirable characteristics, so-called designer babies? at the moment, european countries agreed that screening should only be used. suffering. medical complications can occur, too. >> most of these patients have a history of the handicapped, a genetically induced children
to muslim immigration is an issue that already divides europe, but peacefully. in switzerland, minarets have been banned. in belgium, burqas banned. france, burqas and praying in the streets banned. while this weekend, right wing leaders in europe rejected all forms of violence. they don't want this to happen again. in norway, if one image sums up the nation's pain, it is this. as emergency workers mourn, others break into the national anthem. ♪ brian, here outside oslo cathedral, the center of the mourning, there is a sense of disbelief. as for breivik, he told the court he expects to spend the rest of his life in prison, but in norway, where there is no death penalty, the maximum punishment is 21 years. that means breivik, if found guilty, could be out of jail by the age of 53. >> martin fletcher in a very sad city of oslo, norway tonight, martin, thanks. >>> as his long manifesto shows, the suspect in these killings seemed to be heavily influenced by some people in this country who write and blog about the perceived threat from islam. and tonight one of them, a man named robert spencer,
and dehydration. she is a nurse from switzerland. every day she saves lives here. sometimes her patients die and she grieves for them. >> i tried to do something, but outside, you cannot do anything. he died in my arms. it's really hard. >> so many people are flooding in. there's not enough food, water, or shelter. relief workers are struggling to cope. >> the camp is growing all the time and it is becoming increasingly overcrowded and unsanitary, as well. aid agencies are stretched to the very limit. more people are arriving with every day that passes, with over thousands of them fleeing civil war and droughts in their native somalia. no one here has any intention of going home anytime soon. >> still to come on gmt -- monsters of the deep running the english coast. don't worry. it was 155 million years ago, but we look at the latest scientific revelations. >> dugard, the woman who spent 18 years held captive in a back garden in california has told american tv that the children she bore made her feel less alone. speaking exclusively to diane sawyer of abc, jaycee said she does not know how s
in switzerland. pretty amazing stuff. obviously those three girls, call them girls but they're mature women, young women, amazing stuff. >> great ideas. also some great ideas, a bright idea here as far as usa, i think that we can safely say they're going to beat japan. as a matter of fact, they've never lost to japan in 25 games. >> the odds are pretty good, right? >> exactly. i'll be tuning in on sunday. >> it's been an amazing run so far. >>> coming up, the emmy nomination judges are just mad about a popular cable tv program. >> "mad men" dominates the nomination list, along with a few surprises. you're watching "world news now." >>> the nominations for the 63rd annual primetime emmys are out. and as usual, abc's "mad men" is leading way. >> very popular show. there were plenty of other familiar shows and actors getting nods and a few surprises and snubs too. here's abc's karen travers with more this year's nominees. >> i can see you have good taste. >> reporter: amc's "mad men," which focuses on the changing american workplace in the 1960s, came out on top with 19 nominations including o
is more triple a. >> uk? switzerland. investors will be intelligent despite it is a serious thing. we must have a deal and i believe we will have a deal. but what is more critical that we continue this incredibly important discussion how to grow the economy and reform the tax code and reform entitlements and cut spending and we have to do all of those things and ultimately restore the pren prennal culture in this country which requires us to restrain the excess of government regulation and we need to keep the debate front and center so they do happen. >> carly, thank you . nice catching up with you. >> thank you, neal. >> what ever we come up with is not substantive. it could lead to a massive sell off and persuade average folks to buy what is considered super safe investments . then what? there is an expression called katey, bar the door . >> i want to focus finally what is debated four trillion dollars if they can. it is in spending cuts over the next decade. that is how much the u.s. government is spending this year. total spending. 3.7 trillion and the cut near term are more like 38 bi
than they're reporting. dawson himself writes to his wife in switzerland repeatedly, it's really a lot worse than we're, we're telling in the newspaper. >> and if you were living here, you would either be dead or in a lunatic asylum. you couldn't have stood it. and many people have that problem. there were all kinds of reports of earthquake-induced insanity with people, um, just fleeing -- lot of people actually died of fright according to the newspaper accounts. and the death records that the doctors in town -- >> or committed suicide as a result of the earthquake. and, in fact, all of this was ratcheted up a good deal when, um, the national newspapers were suddenly filled with the predictions of a man named ezekiel stone wiggins who was a self-proclaimed weather professor fete and -- prophet and who predicted that the greatest earthquake ever seen, much larger than the charleston earthquake, was going to hit the united states on september 29th. of course, remember, they're still having aftershocks, they're certainly willing to believe that, um, the most insane things can happen. and
of the things that served his cause. he got to conferences in the switzerland, sweden, england. the archbishop who was over anthony eden was his contact person. and what you had there, some of you have seen the movie valkyrie, but that's the circle he was with. and they are, again, aristocratic military people who wanted the allies to drop the idea of unconditional surrender. because they said if that happens, then germany will surrender, and we can rebuild and so on. anthony eden was not ready to bite it. it would have been high risk for anybody. but, again, the exposure to people of the other churches around the world, catholic, almost none of that happening in the '30s. so i think that opened him to a larger vision. >> the book you cite there from the church to the world partly grows out of this idea that came in one of his late letters that you mentioned. he talks about the world that has come of age. and that phrase and the implications of that then were seized by a variety of people in the years after the book was first published. i mean, can you talk a little bit about how the uses of t
in switzerland repeatedly, it is really a lot worse than we are telling in the newspaper. >> and if you were living near you would either be dead or in a lunatic asylum. you could not have stood it. and many people had that problem. there were all kinds of reports of earthquake induced insanity with people just fleeing. lots of people actually died of fright according to the newspaper accounts. and the death records. the doctors in town. >> committed suicide as a result of the earthquake. and, in fact, all of this was rested up a good deal when the national newspapers were suddenly filled with the predictions of a man named ezekiel stone wigans who was a self-proclaimed whether profit and two predicted that the greatest earthquake ever seen, a smarter than the charleston earthquake was going to hit the estates on september 29th. of course you remember they're still having aftershocks and certainly are willing to believe that the most insane things can happen. and wiggins predictions actually does tell a prediction of a nameless black woman in liberty county georgia who's supposedly set up in
, it's a mixed picture now. gains for the ftse. switzerland's biggest bank reported its profits were down about a 1/2. >> smart money is bting that washington will do the right thing. an interesting headline from forbes magazine contributing writer, saying friends don't let friends become chinese billionaires. >> it's a great headline. this comes from a most interesting article from the china daily. according to the paper, unnatural debts have taken the lives of billionaires in the past years. 19 died from illness. seven died from accidents and 14 were executed. so, according to ray's math, a chinese billionaire dies every 40 days. ali, there seems to be a replenishing supply. last year, china had 64 mi billionaires. >> let's go to jacqui jeras live from atlanta. >>> we need to worry about the flight delays. a lot of them today. our weather headline this morning, there's going to be a lot of pop-up showers and thunderstorms across much of the eastern part of the country. they'll produce some really heavy downpours. we're started out this morning with low clouds in new york city and b
-long particle accelerators built in geneva, switzerland and illinois. and so what is the god particle and what is confirmation of the existence after decades of searching actually mean? joining me is eric pits from the franklin institute, chief astronomer, and derrick, this is going to grab a lot of people's attention and why is it called the god particle, and what is it? >> well, the god particle is known as a higgs bosign and it is by the standard methods of physics not discovered yet. this is crucial, because it is the one particle that scientists will help us to understand basic things about the universe as you said, be one of the most basic ones is that we don't understand why particles have mass, so it is hoped that by discovering this particle we might be able to figure that out as well as figure out things about the early history of the universe, et cetera, et cetera. >> and derrick, tell us more ant the big bang machines, and these are the machines 17, 18 miles long in geneva switzerland and in illinois? >> well, the higgs bosign and this particle known as the god particle is a very,
it over in switzerland. this united states thing out-of-control, nobody is in charge. they can't get anything done. so might have invested 200 million in the united states, paper, treasuries, whatever. i'm going to put it over into switzerland or some place else. that's going to hurt every american. i don't think the idealogues, people in the tea party, things like that, and then on the far left, those kooks, they are insane. i don't think they understand that this is a ripple down effect. everybody is going to get hammered. >> look. it happens on the other side, too. we don't get a good deal on this. and interest rates are going to rise and our economy is going to slow down further. that's why the president ought to be interested in getting the deal done right. >> bill: has to be. >> rather than scoring political points. that's my problem with this president. he has misplayed this. he has played this thing in a way that's diminished confidence in his ability to do a deal. diminished confidence in his word and put us in a place where the likely load that we end up getting something d
, same as switzerland. and they, i mean, i think every house in switzerland has a bunker. and in england they, many disasters, and their knowledge of what to do and be prepared is maybe a little bit more -- >> there are things in countries all over the world that we can emulate and that we can learn from. and one of the persistent problems we have in this country is our unwillingness to recognize that maybe someplace else does it a little better, and there's something we can learn from another country. i'm not sure we can really emulate or adopt everything that another country does. we would never be able to adopt the israeli strategy of how -- we'll never get that mindset. at least maybe -- i hope, i hope we don't have a reason to get that mindset in this country. let me put it that way. but you raise a good point. i pointed this out to a group the other day. they were talking about, you know, we really need to you the federal government because they need to be able to respond better and get more boots on the ground. i immediately thought back to i spent a significant amount of time dur
it to me that's special because that means l it's n easy for you. it's hard in. switzerland with a swing suit he leaped from a 7000 foot cliff. if target? tl the balloon in the hand of one of his ground crew rocke rocketing by at 120 miles per hour. miscalculation of inches could prove fatal for him and his assist taichbility i want to see how close i can get to flying over a person's head. four feet over the head. 3 feet over the head. >>reporter: as he approached the man on the ground it suddenly looked like he was coming in too low. too fast. if these are the cold jagged ridges of switzerland mountain where he practice for most dangerous stunt of his life. if in september in china he will attempt to rocket through this hole in a mountain. threading the needle or dying. >> i'm going dropping out of a helicopter around here at about 2,000 feet above the cave. then i fly towards the cave and i'm come through the cave going this direction the right around here. flying if through the mountain and coming out on the other side of the mountain. >>reporter: this is a single most difficu
to increase the risk of brain cancer in children and teens. switzerland researchers looked at hundreds of brain cancer patients and found they were not more likely to have been regular cell phone users. however, the study only looked at childhood brain tumors and not the long- term risk. >> the question, the child that begins using the cell phone at 7 or 12 when they are 47, after four decades of using the cell phone, is their risk of developing brain cancer higher? >> reporter: there is speculation children may be more susceptible because their skulls are thinner and more radiation could penetrate the brain tissue. experts say if you're concerned, use an earpiece or the phone's speaker. sheryl greenwald isn't worry because her daughter mostly texts and only talks on the phone when necessary. >> it makes me feel better, as soon as she calls me. i know that she's okay. >> reporter: rebecca likes her independence but also likes knowing help is just a phone call away. this study won't end the debate. at this time the preponderance of evidence is against the hypothesis that cell phones cau
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)

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